Any Pug Owners, Breeders or Knowledgeable Dog Breed People?

I have been doing my research on Pugs as I find some of them very cute!
I would like more insight though.
1.) What is the difference between Pugs and Chinese Pugs?
-I have been trying to find the answer on the internet. I know some internet sites that say they don’t exist but others say they do.
2.) What are they prone to?
-I know they are prone to eye problems, elongated soft palate, obesity, PDE, PRA, Luxating Patella, Stenotic Nares, Collapsing Trachea, PK, and Entropion. Anything else?
3.) How much do Pugs cost from a GREAT breeder (roughly)?
-I’ve seen them from $100-$1,000. Roughly what would a really good breeder charge?
4.)What’s an easy way to house break them?
-I know that their size and being stubborn they can be hard to house train.
5.) Is it true Pug have a reverse sneeze?
-I heard this from somewhere, not to sure where but I am curious if this is true.
6.) Could a Pug be a farm dog?
-I know they are not active and mainly sleep, and are not good in hot weather, but that does not bother me. I live in Wyoming so it gets really cold out here, even in summer.

Are there any good breeders in Wyoming or Ohio?
I just recently moved to Wyoming, and still adjusting.
I have family in Ohio that I visit a lot, so a breeder in Ohio could even work!

I am not looking to get a Pug right away, I just want to get some more knowledge on them, before I even make the decision.

Oh, I also want to know how healthy a Pug could be when coming from a pet store. I know they come from puppy mills, and a lot of them are not healthy at all.
I was at the mall tonight and since I was close I stopped into the pet store. I fell in love with a playful Pug. I noticed his breathing was labored, he seemed to look like he was going to sneeze, but didn’t. I also thought at one point he was coughing, and he had clear drainage coming from his nose. What could possibly be wrong with him? Part of my wanted to buy him then and there, even though I would be supporting puppy mills, and take him to a vet and get him healthy. Good or bad idea?

Thanks dog ssection!

i would say get books and start reading. talk to vets and groomers. talk to trainers. talk to people at pet stores and dog parks.
would have to google breeders and go look at them and see.
1. don’t think any. pugs are from china.
2. would have to check out breed standards. google it usually tell what defects are in breed.
3. depends on blood line, quality,
4. same as any other dog, you take out
5. most small dogs will do this, not sure why except bad breeding is what i think
6. any dog can be if raised in house with you

sounds like a sick puppy
maybe $3000 later you might get him over what he has. but then he will have other medical problems, more than likely.
bad idea

5 Responses to “Any Pug Owners, Breeders or Knowledgeable Dog Breed People?”

  1. *Dog Trainer* says:

    God DON’T buy from the pet store, you are not "saving" you are giving them money for a new dog to take his place there, and supporting what they’re doing.

    ALL of your questions are great to ask, and can be answered by a good breeder, and though reading on the Pug Club of America’s website. I don’t know what "Chinese pug" means, but the breed itself originates in China. Don’t price-shop a dog, you get what you pay for.
    References :
    http://www.pugs.org/ There is also a breeder referral page, can at least ask them your questions

    Health info- http://www.pugs.org/indexhealth.htm

  2. Pixie says:

    Very bad idea to buy a puppy from a petstore-that MONEY you pay for that PUP will got straight to producing another litter at the farm as well as encourage others to go to petstore instead of either going to reputable breeder or animal shelter! The reality is that no responsible breeder would ever place one of their puppies in a pet shop. A breeder who has placed a puppy in a pet shop has disqualified himself as a responsible breeder. A USDA license is not something that should reassure you. On the contrary, it is warning sign that a breeder is cranking out lots of puppies.My advice to you is to IGNORE everything pet shop people tell you. The pet store industry has sophisticated marketing manuals that teach pet shop owners and employees exactly what to say to persuade you to part with your money. Don’t be gullible.Convenience, immediacy, no-questions-asked . . . those are the advantages of pet shops. The ONLY advantages, in fact. The problem is, almost no one who buys from a pet shop stops to consider the DISadvantages.there are health tests that can determine, with 100% accuracy, whether a puppy has inherited certain serious health problems. There are other health tests that can’t say for sure, but can predict the risk. Responsible breeders do these tests. Breeders who sell to pet stores don’t.
    Other pet shop puppies have learned to nip from all the people who take them out of their cages and play wrestling games with them. This encourages the puppy to growl and nip and mouth people’s hands – bad lessons that can be hard to correct.When you buy one of those cute puppies in the pet shop, you buy more than the puppy. You buy the budding physical, behavioral, and health problems created by the bad genes passed on by untested parents whom you never get to see or evaluate. And you feed a profit-hungry industry that’s doing a lot of harm to innocent creatures.

    1. Pugs require a lot of time and attention.
    2. Pugs cannot be kept as outside dogs. Because of their short noses, they are very sensitive to heat, humidity and cold. Pugs can die very quickly when exposed to extreme heat or cold so they cannot live outside or be left outside for any period of time unattended. 3
    3. Pugs shed. A lot. Even though they have short hair, they have a double coat, which means there is twice as much fluffy hair to come off. Ever seen a tumbleweed? Pugs shed tumbleweeds of fur - 365 days a year. They also snort, sneeze, and snore. A lot. And they pass gas. And they never, ever say excuse me.

    4. Small children and pugs are not a good combination. While pugs are not generally aggressive dogs, young children tend to be fascinated with their curly tails and bulging eyes. Pugs eyes are very sensitive and easily injured, and having their tails pulled can make even the most easy-going pug snap at the person who is doing the pulling.

    5. Pugs require some special care. See that cute little wrinkle over the pugs nose? Dirt and moisture get in there and the nose wrinkle can get infected. You need to clean the nose wrinkle daily. Ears tend to get dirty quickly and need to be cleaned, nails clipped often (they use their paws like cats to clean their faces and can knock an eye out if left long) and anal glands need to be "expressed" frequently or you may get "slimed" with foul smelling excretions when you least expect it.

    6. Pugs can’t go running, hiking or bicycling with you.

    7. Pugs have tendencies to develop certain physical problems. Every breed has problems that they are more likely to experience. Pugs are prone to eye problems. (Almost 1/2 or more of all pugs will need eye medicine at some point in their life. One common ointment is $40.00 for a tiny tube). Luxating patella’s (slipping knees), elongated soft palate’s, pinched or undersized nostrils, narrow tracheas, spinal problems, pug dog encephalitis, liver shunts and other medical problems are "common" in the pug breed.

    8. Pugs are difficult to housebreak
    9. Think pugs are couch potatoes? Think again.
    10. Since pugs are getting so popular, I think I’ll get a female and breed her. I can probably make some good money. First of all, you will most likely lose money breeding your pug.
    References :
    http://www.yourpurebredpuppy.com/buying/articles/petshops-and-pet-stores.html
    http://frankthepug.com/index.htm

  3. ladystang says:

    i would say get books and start reading. talk to vets and groomers. talk to trainers. talk to people at pet stores and dog parks.
    would have to google breeders and go look at them and see.
    1. don’t think any. pugs are from china.
    2. would have to check out breed standards. google it usually tell what defects are in breed.
    3. depends on blood line, quality,
    4. same as any other dog, you take out
    5. most small dogs will do this, not sure why except bad breeding is what i think
    6. any dog can be if raised in house with you

    sounds like a sick puppy
    maybe $3000 later you might get him over what he has. but then he will have other medical problems, more than likely.
    bad idea
    References :

  4. ?Dalmatian Appreciation? says:

    1.) What is the difference between Pugs and Chinese Pugs?
    >> They’re just called Pugs, no more, no less. BYB and puppymills would be the ones calling them Chinese Pugs, much like they do calling Bulldogs English Bulldogs.
    2.) What are they prone to?
    >>Your list was extensive. No doubt they suffer from a few other ailments as well.
    3.) How much do Pugs cost from a GREAT breeder (roughly)?
    >>It varies from breeder to breeder. I would not expect to pay any less than $800 for a well-bred pup.
    4.)What’s an easy way to house break them?
    >> Like any other pup, consistency is key. Don’t give up.
    5.) Is it true Pug have a reverse sneeze?
    >>I’m not sure
    6.) Could a Pug be a farm dog?
    >> Well a Pug wouldn’t go round herding your sheep or goats, but may be content following you around while you do farm chores.

    I suggest you go to the parent club http://www.pugs.org/ for more information and to help you find a reputable responsible breeder.

    I would never buy a pup from a pet shop, even if it was sick. You said yourself they come from puppymills. If you had bought it, regardless of your good intentions, you are giving the mill money to churn out more sickly pups.
    Good luck!
    References :

  5. Bailey Adams says:

    1. They’re the same thing. It’s been pretty much proven that pugs originated from China, not Holland like we originally thought.
    2. They’re VERY prone to allergies, eye problems, and obesity. Everything else is something that some dogs get and some don’t, it’s basically luck of the draw.
    3. A good breeder will charge around $1000. You want a dog with champion parents and is registered. Although I highly recommend getting a rescue, a lot of rescue dogs actually have less problems than many purebreds.
    4. They can be quite stubborn, but love treats so definitely use treats to train. All it takes is patience and they’ll learn.. it’s not as hard to people seem to think.
    5. All dogs reverse sneeze. It’s not a condition or anything bad, it’s just something that happens sometimes.
    6. I know lots of pugs that are farm dogs. However, they shouldn’t be outdoors much in any extreme weather hot or cold.

    Pet store puppies are very rarely healthy. They are usually the pugs you hear about the suffer from many different conditions and cost a lot in vet bills. They’re also usually overpriced. It’s a very bad idea to get a dog from a pet store, it’ll just cost you thousands of dollars in the long run. Once again, I recommend going to http://www.petfinder.com and looking into rescues. There’s way too many pugs being euthanized in shelters.

    I seriously encourage you to join the pugvillage forum at http://www.pugvillage.com/forum/
    We’re basically like a family and there’s people there that have owned and bred pugs for decades. You can ask any questions you want
    References :

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